Review: For Better and Worse

How seriously would you take these wedding vows if something like murder was on your spouse’s mind?

First of all, Happy Pub Day to Margot Hunt’s novel, For Better and Worse! For my BoTM subscribers you will definitely want to add this as an extra book for your January box. If you aren’t a BoTM subscriber, you should still find this one on a bookstore shelf somewhere!

My quick & dirty thoughts on this crime thriller: Seriously gripping, heart pounding, and nearly impossible to put down while you’re in the middle of it.       38350063

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On their first date back in law school, Natalie and Will Clarke bonded over drinks, dinner and whether they could get away with murder. Now married, they’ll put the latter to the test when an unchecked danger in their community places their son in jeopardy. Working as a criminal defense attorney, Nat refuses to rely on the broken legal system to keep her family safe. She knows that if you want justice…you have to get it yourself.

Shocked to discover Nat’s taken matters into her own hands, Will has no choice but to dirty his, also. His family is in way too deep to back down now. He’s just not sure he recognizes the woman he married. Nat’s always been fiercely protective, but never this ruthless or calculating. With the police poking holes in their airtight plan, what will be the first to fall apart: their scandalous secret—or their marriage?

For Better and Worse expertly executes the question: how far would you go to protect and save the people you love? 

Told in three parts, two of them from Natalie’s POV and one from Will’s POV, we understand there are multiple sides to every marriage, just like there are with individual people.

What is great about this one is the slow build. We slowly learn about their marriage, the scandal that is rocking their small town, and then around page 80, suddenly we are hit with the blunt object of this plot. Soon after, everything spirals into chaos.

You can feel Nat’s heartache and Will’s anxiety and guilt through their individual sections. Hunt is wise enough to bring an array of emotions to the surface as no two people would react the same to some horror of this magnitude.

One slight issue I took with this one was Will’s commentary of their marriage. It was a typical guy thought process, so logically it made sense, but I didn’t like some of the thoughts he had surrounding his wife. They were a bit eye rolling and chuckle worthy because sometimes men need to get over themselves and take responsibility for their actions; just like women are forced to. He did show some growth towards the end, and Nat was also more prominently featured so I think that saved my overall rating for this one.

For all my thriller fans out there, this is one you definitely want to pick up!

So it’s Tuesday and we are literally three [d: drie] weeks away from the end of the year! What is everyone out there reading to wrap up their year? Or are you taking a break to work on some other things?

I have at least two more blog posts planned for the year, and then I think I will take some time to work on that monster of a novel I started and then only got about halfway through during NaNo.

Until next time bookish buds!

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Feminine Voices in Mythology

Sirens. Half formed creatures. Monsters. Goddesses. Slaves. Captors. Witches. Villains.

These are the words that first spring to mind when I think of women who are widely known in mythology. Sure, goddesses might seem like a complementary word. But when speaking of goddesses in mythology, they generally exist only for the male gaze or for the pleasure of men.

This notion really didn’t dawn on me until I recently discovered two books set in ancient times whose objective was to retell and reform these original ‘classic,’ tales to include a female voice.

Both The Silence of the Girls by Pat Barker and Circe. by Madeline Miller, seek to reclaim lost voices that history conveniently skips over. These books couldn’t have more different narrators, but they contain this common theme of shedding light on the female perspective within mythology.

This is a long post on feminism in mythology and how it is needed, so buckle up readers.
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